Montana RIB Update

http://www.nwlincs.org/mtlincs/opi/reading/rbindex.htm

5/12/08

Happy Mother's Day to all of you!
Even to you guys out there - where would you be without your mother?
Now there's a connection for you!  =) 
 
 

OVERVIEW

Reading connections?  Yes, they are everywhere.  Some are in Mother's Day cards; others are on seed packets for the garden; still more are involved in daily decision-making.  Last month MT LINCS stated the following: 

Bottomline, we want our students to be able to make informed choices about everything they do.  So it is our job to provide a sound learning environment for them.  We must teach them strategies and demonstrate how to transfer those strategies to everything they read and do.  

In order to provide a successful learning environment, one thing is for certain - we need to set realistic and attainable goals.

 

READING CONNECTIONS:  BEST PRACTICES

This literacy "thing" is really a circle, isn't it?  We ask our students to tell us their goals.  Then we work with our students to help them achieve one of their goals - all the time trying to show them the connections to their life.  We try to approach things a step at a time, find success, regroup, and move on to the next goal.  Most importantly, we celebrate the successes and acknowledge the failures as stepping stones to future success.  We help make the connection! 

 

Earlier, MT LINCS had noted that the Bridges to Practice information "just echoes best practices that may be used with most ABLE students."  Let's take a look at some other B2P thoughts.

 

Research

 

 

#1

Learning is a journey ... The journey begins with the formulation of programs goals and objectives, then moves on to how instruction is organized into units and lessons ...

Instructional plan development includes three major steps:

1.  set realistic and attainable goals

2.  break down goals into short-term objectives

3.  transform short-term objectives into unit and lesson plans.

 Bridges to Practice:  A Research-based Guide for Literacy Practitioners Serving Adults with Learning Disabilities.  Guidebook 3, The Planning Process.  NIFL, 1999, p. 23

#2

Research on intervention practices has yielded twelve characteristics of effective instruction, or LD-appropriate instruction, for adults with learning disabilities ...

1. structured; 2. connected; 3. informative; 4. explicit; 5. direct; 6. scaffolded; 7. intensive; 8. process-sensitive; 9. accommodating; 10. evaluated; 11. generalizable; 12. enduring.

Bridges to Practice:  A Research-based Guide for Literacy Practitioners Serving Adults with Learning Disabilities.  Guidebook 4, The Planning Process.  NIFL, 1999, p. 41. 

(Descriptions of the twelve techniques can be found on p.42 - 49 of Book 4.)

 

In her book, Applying Research in Reading Instruction for Adults:  First Steps for Teachers, Susan McShane also makes notes of some of the same strategies listed above.    

 

 

#3

The research reviews have a lot in common.  Featured prominently are references to sequencing of tasks, the need for explanation, modeling and guided practice, and the importance of multiple practice opportunities ...

Applying Research in Reading Instruction for Adults:  First Steps for Teachers (McShane, 2005, p.128)

When students achieve success, they learn what strategies work best for themselves.  Once again, good learning strategies provide connections for success in all areas. 
 

RESOURCES

 

QUESTIONS FOR THINKING/DISCUSSION:  You may reply to this email.

 

    1. What strategies have you used for effective instruction?
    2. What are some ideas you have for self-advocacy?
SUMMARY

Summer is coming!  Haven't had time to see everything posted on MT LINCS RIB?  Check it out!  You will find some terrific resources for summer school or next fall.  Also be thinking about what thoughts you have for MT LINCS.  Stay connected!

 

P.S.  If you no longer wish to receive this mailing, please let me know!  Thanks!

 
Norene Peterson
Adult Education Center
415 N. 30th
Billings, MT 59101

norenehp@bresnan.net