Montana LINCS Update

2/27/12

Greetings from Montana LINCS

  

Problems with the links in the email?

Go to the Email Archives in the upper left-hand corner on the home page at http://www.nwlincs.org/mtlincs/index.htm

 

  

1.  Montana ABLE ShopTalk Summary Posted

 

Click here http://www.nwlincs.org/mtlincs/opi/shoptalk2-21-12.pdf  to read the ShopTalk Summary from February 21.

 

2.  Montana MABLE Site Performance Summary

 

Click here http://www.nwlincs.org/mtlincs/opi/shoptalk2-21-12.pdf   and scroll down to page 11 to read more information about the new Site Performance Summary in MABLE.

 

The Site Performance pages have been added to give programs an at-a-glance look at what is happening within

their program and how their counts fit into the statewide totals for the same measures. For comparison, your site

data from the two prior years is also included …   

 

3.  Montana MABLE Distance Learning:  Best Practice

 

March 2, 2012 8:00-9:00

o   Adobe Connect/Conference Call

o   Contact Carol Flynn for more information.

 

4.  MTLINCS Calendar

 

Click here http://www.nwlincs.org/mtlincs/calendar.htm  to access MTLINCS Calendar.

 

5.  MPAEA Conference 2012 in Helena:  One Day Registration and Outstanding Student Award

 

One Day Registration Now Available!

 

One Day Registration is now available FOR EVERYONE FOR $100!  Please check out the following link: https://www.mpaea.org/?page=register, and look for one day registration options for those of you who cannot come to all three days!

 

Early Bird Rate expires March 10!!!  Register now!

MPAEA Outstanding Student Award

 

During the conference, MPAEA would like to acknowledge a quality student from each Montana program.

 

Criteria are:

 

·       One student will be recognized from each program that nominates a student. The form must be completed, saved, and emailed to Ellen Guettler at ellen.guettler@bsd7.org .

 

·       The student should have been enrolled within the program year and have made significant progress or have had a positive impact through example on fellow students in the program.

 

Click here http://www.nwlincs.org/mtlincs/mpaea/MPAEA_Outstanding_Student_Award_Nomination_Form_2012.doc  to access the form!  Deadline is Friday, March 16 at 5:00 p.m.

National Information

 

6.  Corrections:   OVAE Hosts Discussion of Reentry Education Programming

 

Taken from OVAE Connection

 

Click here http://www2.ed.gov/news/newsletters/ovaeconnection/index.html to access a new and exciting ESL website.

 

Attorney General Eric Holder’s call for federal agencies to join in prisoner reentry work has brought OVAE’s efforts to the fore in ED’s response. The most recent among them occurred on Jan. 20, when OVAE Assistant Secretary Brenda Dann-Messier hosted a meeting of an expert panel of criminologists, education administrators, leaders of community-based organizations, correctional officials and formerly incarcerated individuals to examine a draft conceptual model of reentry education programming based on a review of research on reentry …

 

7.  ESL:  New Website

 

Taken from LINCS ELA Discussion List

Click here http://easyworldofenglish.com/  to access a new and exciting ESL website.

 

We would greatly appreciate your feedback about our new website http://easyworldofenglish.com.  Our site is geared mostly toward literacy and beginner/intermediate ESOL learners.  Our main objective is to empower our students to become independent learners who are able to take charge of the learning process.  Therefore, we worked hard on creating a website that is very intuitive and easy to use.  We've been getting very positive feedback from other fellow instructors who piloted the site with their students.  Many of them reported that students were very engaged and enjoyed using the materials.  In terms of content, the site has 4 components:  Grammar, Reading, Pronunciation and a picture dictionary (great for literacy students).  The site features various multimedia resources to support motivation and help scaffold understanding. This project is "work in progress", so we welcome your great ideas and recommendations. The site is free, but users need to register to access all the lessons.

 

8.  Math:  Word Problems and Real Life in Everyday Academics and Math

 

Taken from LINCS Numeracy Discussion List

Click here http://lincs.ed.gov/pipermail/numeracy/2012/date.html to follow the discussion on word problems.

 

The question of finding relevant word problems is a hot-button issue for me.

 

The crux of the matter seems to be in determining what is a realistic context for students. In practice, it often means that instructors pick topics that they think are realistic, such as budgeting or shopping. However, Alison Tomlin, in her article "Real Life in Everyday and Academic Math" challenges the idea that instructors should determine the topics to be covered, and challenges especially the idea that instructors can take real life situations and turn them into math problems that relate to students' lives ...

 

Click here http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED473855.pdf   for the article, “Real Life in Everyday and Academic Math”.

 

9.  Reading:  Reading Levels Discussion and Sight Words Discussion

 

Taken from LINCS Learning Disabilities and Reading/Writing Discussion Lists

Click here http://lincs.ed.gov/pipermail/readwrite/2012/date.html  to follow the discussion on reading level.

 

Michael asks what a compilation of individual words by grade level might accomplish. One use would be for agencies who are making easy to read materials for the general public. For example, a refrigerator company who wants to make sure that their instruction manual is written at a level that most people can read.

Daphne Greenberg, Moderator

 

Click here http://lincs.ed.gov/pipermail/learningdisabilities/2012/date.html to follow the discussion on encoding versus decoding.

 

… If you look at the Dolch or Fry lists, most are "decodable"--but most are function words, too, and must be so well internalized that they do not slow down the flow of reading.  

I  have taught SO MANY students who got thoroughly stuck on the sounding out process and could never make reading as fast a process as it must be-- 44 nanoseconds was the number one expert in brain studies used to explain how automatic recognition of words normally works-- from visual to phonological processing to meaning.  It won't happen if the reader is continually sounding out things.   So at some point an awful lot of words that are repeated often MUST be automatic in that process and NOT sounded out.  

 

Robin H. Lovrien, Ph.D.
Consultant in Adult ESOL/Learning Difficulties

 

 

P.S.  Remember -- if you are having trouble with the links in this email, go to the Email Archives at the top of the MTLINCS homepage at http://www.nwlincs.org/mtlincs/ .  Also if you no longer wish to receive this mailing, please let me know!  Thanks!

 

Norene Peterson
Adult Education Center
415 N. 30th
Billings, MT 59101

norenehp@bresnan.net